POWr Multi Slider

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Greenlight GM Futurliner



One of the most popular castings to come out to date is the GM Futurliner.  For some reason it seems to be a difficult model to make into a replica as only two diecast manufacturers have taken the initiative to make the models: Norev and Greenlight.  I was able to snag the new Greenlight Futurliner before the prices went up, just to see a piece of history that is also a record-setter for a car auction.  Twice.



Click Here for Photo Gallery



The idea started in 1935 when the Parade of Progress was started, with help from General Motors.  The whole idea behind this road show is to show the latest in technological innovations that would be the future in America, including stereo sound, microwave ovens, television.  After a while, and when General Motors started to support the parade, there was a need for a simpler way to showcase on the road without the complexity of setting up the tents and devices at each stop.  The solution came way with the Futurliner, a large van based on a truck chassis designed to showcase the new innovations in a simpler and more attractive format.  At 32 feet long, 7 feet wide, and 11 feet tall it was the largest vehicles on the road in the 1940's.  The chassis was based on the heavy-duty GMC frames that would also be used in World War II GMC trucks as well.  The wheels were duallies all-around, the powertrain a 4-cylinder diesel with a 3-speed manual transmission, later converted to a gas I-6 and 2-speed manual or Hydramatic automatic in the 1950's update.  The weight is two tons, the top speed 40 to 50 mph, and the feature is the sides of the truck that fold down flat to create a display area; in the backbone of the roof is where the item on display stands below lights that swing out and illuminate the feature on display.  When not in use the sides fold up and its on its way; the controls to power all of this are located at an access door at the back of the vehicle.



Click Here for Photo Gallery


Styling was done by Harley Earl, and it's no wonder as the look was timeless and very futuristic even for the 1940's.  The body is red with a white roof and lower chrome that wraps all-around the truck.  The front has the large GM letters with quad headlights just below and note the door handles for the two doors on the sides to access the cockpit.  The sides have the Parade of Progress and the lines for the folding display; unfortunately both Norev and Greenlight did not provide the function of the folding display unit in the back.  The rear has detailed taillights, dual panel doors, and those chrome hubcaps hiding the dual tires, oh and even though this is 1:64 scale it's so huge that it needs to fit in the 1:43 display case, with the roof exhaust tip just kissing the top of the display!  The chassis is metal and shows off the information, but nothing else, while the interior (which I got better pictures because I had to take it apart to find out what that rattle was inside.  Turns out it was extra flash from the chrome parts) shows the steps to get to the top where the driver sits in the middle, passenger's to the sides, and heads the wrap-around dashboard with the large white 3-spoke steering wheel.  I can imagine the view out of the real thing would be amazing and very scary when you're the biggest rig on the road.



Click Here for Photo Gallery


So as far as functionality goes it's not that interesting, but for the sheer history and rarity of the actual model and the model in scale this is one pretty nice casting, and trust me $25.00 for one (I paid $20 as a pre-order) is better for the almost billions of dollars paid for one, twice, at two Barrett-Jackson auctions!


Click Here for Photo Gallery

No comments:

Post a Comment