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Sunday, May 8, 2016

More Chevelle's from Greenlight (1968-1969) and Welly 1:43 (1971)




If you've ever seen my collection (and probably not) you will see quite a bit of Chevelle's.  I always loved the Chevelle's, especially the 1969 body style, yet I do not collect every model year Chevelle ever made nor do I ever collect every replica of one model.  Only the best will do, and to show it i've obtained countless variations since I did a review on two Chevelle's of interest: the Greenlight 1:64 1968 and 1969 Chevelle coupes and convertibles, and the Welly 1:43 pullback 1971 Chevelle SS convertible.











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Greenlight 1968-1969 Chevelle's

One of my favorite castings of the 1968 and 1969 Chevelle is from Greenlight, who has done a splendid job with the level of details on such a small casting.  I remember my first encounter with the two 1968 coupes (blue Stock and metallic red Custom) and the first 1969 Yenko coupe, and I was hooked.  Problem is most of the time any other variations were hard-to-find in stores and for a few years the casting was MIA, then returning in the new GL Muscle series to continue on.  Since then the 1968 and convertibles have been the hard-to-find ones, the latter highly on my want-list for a while.  Now I finally have them: the red 1969Chevelle convertible was purchased online in package from the Barrett-Jackson series, the same on the blue 1969 convertible, the sole GL Chevelle convertible in my collection until now, would also appear later on.  The other side is the rarely used 1968 convertible casting in metallic green from the GL Hobby series.  Both have nice paint jobs, excellent level of details (even better than some of today's Greenlight releases), two-tone interior and opening hoods.






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Look close and you can see the differences in body styles (the rear-ends require a new tooling for each model year), along with the steering wheel, though the chassis, engine, and the rest of the interior carries over.  Not sure why Greenlight doesn't use the convertible casting often, but they should!  Just before those two arrived, just about a few years ago, I got these loose 1968 Chevelle's from an older release: The yellow-colored 1968 coupe was from the Barrett-Jackson series and it looks gorgeous in that color, while the silver coupe looks stock, but it's from a Stock and Custom series as the Custom version: look closely and you can see the ghost flames on the sides of the vehicle just after the front wheels.  I also find the unique mag wheels with gray center was one of the first Greenlight castings to get this feature that is now commonplace at Greenlight (just look at the Yenko Chevelle's).









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Two more 1969 Chevelle's of interest:  The green version would be the precursor to the Yenko dynasty in future releases with the COPO Chevelle in green with matching green interior.  It gives a stealthy appearance of a typical Chevelle that houses the big 427 motor underneath.  The other one is the Chevelle race car from the movie "Talladega Nights: The ballad of Ricky Bobby".  Paint quality was not as good on my tester, but it does have a few unique features: the rear bumper sticker that says "If you're not first, you're last!" and the unique wheels that I don't recall being used on a lot of Greenlight cars as of late.  Finally is the plethora of Yenko Chevelle's that have been released lately, most of them in Greenlight Muscle series releases.  The blue was the beginning, and was very hot when it came out, but after a few more the hotness has waned a bit.  For the yellow, orange, and gold releases the vinyl top is standard, but would take a breather from a very nice dark green Yenko Chevelle used for the reincarnated Barrett-Jackson series.  At this point i'm tired of seeing another Yenko, so it's time to do another casting and another deco.









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Welly 1:43 1971 Chevelle SS454 Convertible

When it comes to Welly pullback cars ususally two colors is the norm: the first one is the most common, followed by the occasionally-seen second, and if it ever has the rarely-seen third color, chances are it might not likely be easy to find.  Not so with the 1971 Chevelle: after the blue version that I reviewed a while ago, the Chevelle has kept it going with two more colors.  I'd expected the orange with white stripes and white interior to follow after the 1:24 scale version so it was a no-brainer (and a very attractive one to boot), but I'd never expected the bumblebee-colored yellow with black stripes version with white interior of recent.  What this adds up is a trio of impressive colors, more eye-catching with the orange and yellow, and at least those two still have all of their door panels (when I got the blue one it was missing the driver's side door panel, and I thought I may never see another one again so I got it and removed the passenger-side door panel to match).  One must wonder what's next of this Welly Chevelle casting for colors: could silver be on the table?










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