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Saturday, June 17, 2017

Majorette Jaguar F-type Coupe, Porsche Cayenne, and Volkswagen Beetle Convertible




Here's a few more interesting Majorette models that range from a spory coupe to an SUV.







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Jaguar F-type Coupe

Now you should already know the F-type on my blog as I have reviewed the Welly 1:24, Matchbox 1:64, and recently the Top Mark 1:35 roadster.  Now here's the most fantastic model of the bunch from Majorette, the F-type coupe.  Standing out in its signature orange with black wheels it puts the Matchbox casting to shape.  Speaking of which last year the second recolor of the Matchbox F-type is orange, so time for a comparison to see just how good the Majorette version is.  First off, the front has the proper look with the clear headlights and black-tampo grille with Jaguar logo, black side gills, and lower chin spoiler.  The Matchbox version has the proper mesh grille details, but not in the black trim color.  The hood on both have the black scoops, but the Majorette adds the black front fender scoops as well.  Now the side profile really shows the differences between the two as the Majorette version goes for blacked-out multi-spoke wheels that really look great here and a visible B-pillar.  While the Majorette version is slightly bigger than the Matchbox it look less bloated than the Matchbox version that I complained about.  Each has a unique feature: Matchbox a panoramic sunroof, Majorette opening doors.








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At the rear both do the same taillight, quad exhaust, rear spoiler with Jaguar logo, and rear base plate in plate area design well with the Majorette offering crisp lines.  On the track the Majorette version is much more fun-to-drive thanks to the working suspension and the nible feel.  Shouldn't make a difference here between the two, but it does so in a big way.  The engine's on both use the same 4.2L supercharged V8 and 7-speed automatic to the rear wheels.  The interior is another vast difference as the Majorette version details the bolstered seats, dashboard layout, and the 3-spoke steering wheel to the school bus wheel of the Matchbox version.  You can see better in the Matchbox version, but the Majorette version is much better despite the duplicate grab bar to the left of the center stack (should only be on the right-side).  Overall Majorette wins by a majority here giving us a perfectly-done casting that has the look and feel of the real F-type coupe.








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Porsche Cayenne

In the U.S. SUV's are a big deal so in order for a car manufacturer to survive it must have some sort of SUV in their line despite backlash from loyalists.  One of those debates was Porsche when the Cayenne first appeared in 2003.  Porsche was only known, and should be known, as a sports car company, but when the finances are in dire need a cash cow is needed: the Cayenne would be it.  Since then it has spawn a smaller Macan SUV and the Panamerica sedan, both help Porsche survive while still allowing the 911 to live on.  This Majorette version is based on the current second-generation Cayenne, which is to say does not look much different from the previous version aside from smoother lines and now can be confused with the smaller Macan from a distance.  This is an SUV that still has the sporty looks and performance, but with the capability of an SUV in terms of hauling people or cargo and off-road credibility with a two-speed transfer case.  The engine is a 4.8L DOHC V8 that produces 390 horsepower through a eight-speed Tiptronic automatic transmission.  The interior has a dashboard and console design modeled after the Panamerica sedan.  Hybrid models are also offered.









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This Majorette version comes in a flat gray color that seems rather odd for this casting.  The front has clear headlights modeled after the Carerra GT, more rounded bumper with larger vents and LED running lights, and a chin skidplate.  The sides show a profile that is less boxy than the first-generation and is now more smooth, accented by chrome 5-spoke wheels.  The rear has LED taillights that now dip into the rear hatch, a rear spoiler, and quad exhaust tips.  A few odd points on this casting: a trailer hitch that is nice for towing, yet looks out-of-place on the rear bumper, and the rear opening hatch lacks a rear window.  On the track the SUV still has that sports car DNA in it as it handles the course very well for an SUV with little body roll and fast reflexes.  The rear cargo area is spacious, as is the five-passenger cabin with a detailed dashboad that shows the 3-spoke steering wheel, center stack and console with detailed buttons and shifter, and even the vents on the top part of the dashboard are detailed.  Aside from some odd rear-end touches this is one nicely done Porsche Cayenne.







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2012 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible

The Beetle was redesigned in 2012 after over a decade as the same New Beetle that charmed us and then wore off.  The new Beetle has a lower roofline, longer wheelbase, and canted corners.  The look of the Beetle still remans and it looks much better now.  The interior has a more proper dashboard layout that is upright and flat instead of rather deep like the New Beetle.  Another change is the convertible: gone is the convertible top that rests on top of the rear trunk as the new system uses a Porsche Boxster-like smooth look where a portion of the top blends in with the rest of the surrounding window edge, now lined in chrome trim.  Still based on the VW Golf platform it uses a 1.8L DOHC I-4 that produces 120 est. horsepower through a six-speed manual or seven-speed automatic transmission.  At this point the Beetle is running out of life as the Golf is still a sales leader and as with all retro vehicles there's a lack of future direction for the styling.  The Beetle could end production before the end of this decade.






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Majorette did two different versions of the 2012 Beetle model: the Coupe that is outfitted in GSR trim and this convertible.  I decided to go for the convertible as Majorette is the only one to offer the convertible of this generation.  The red paint with chrome 5-spoke wheels look good on this car and give it a sporty look.  The front has clear round headlights, VW logo, and lower bumper scoop where I added foglight details.  The sides show the flared fenders and a lower chrome strip to give some character, while the rear has larger round taillights, VW logo, plate area where the base tabs in, and with the convertible top now flush there's room for a rear spoiler.  The windshield frame looks oddly-shaped, but then again given the roofline shape this should be close to normal.  On the track it has some sporty character in the handling, but still this is not a pure sports car.  The interior shows seating for four with the convertible top nestled behind the rear seats in a neat fashion.  There are detailed door panels front and rear, 3-spoke steering wheel, round gauge pod, and flat dashboad with center stack controls.  The New Beetle is an overdone casting in the diecast world, something that Majorette has surprisingly avoided, but with this 2012 Beetle Majorette has redeemed itself with a nicely done convertible and also a nicely done coupe as well.


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